Money and You

Medicare: Open Enrollment (Lakeside Chat 10-8-20)

October 8, 2020 | Topics: Retirement Planning, Video

This week we will have guest speaker, Ronald Gist, discuss Medicare and the open enrollment period coming up.

Social Security (Lakeside Chats 9-1-20)

September 1, 2020 | Topics: Retirement Planning, Financial Planning, Video

We revisited a topic of high interest, Social Security. Our host will be Matt Sperazzo.

Matt is an External Business Consultant with John Hancock Investments and has been with the company for 13 years. Matt also has his NSSA designation through the National Social Security Advisors Association.

Changing Gears from Saving to Spending in Retirement: What You Need to Know

Changing gears from earning and saving your money to spending your savings is a major challenge for most of us. It’s not that sudden massive shopping sprees or a lavish lifestyle are planned by most retirees — the spending usually involves buying routine things. The challenge is in adjusting to where the money comes from during your retirement.

5 Myths about Getting Your Affairs in Order

No, It's not only for the wealthy. 

You know it. I know it. Just about everyone knows it. Setting up a will and other “in case of emergency” documents is important. But procrastination and misperceptions make it easy to put off getting your affairs in order. One 2019 survey found that 76% know a will is important, but only 40% have one. Let’s look at 5 common myths that may be keeping you from enjoying the satisfaction and peace of mind that comes from accomplishing an important task for yourself, your family, and/or your business.

How to Find the Best Financial Advisor for You Now

You have probably seen the articles. Some are long. Some are short. The common thread is that the writer claims there is one perfect and absolute set of questions to ask (and corresponding answers) whenever you interview a potential financial advisor. I don’t think so.

Your Retirement Spending AND Income: Two Plans are Better than One

Retirement plans demonstrate the wisdom of the proverb “two heads are better than one” — a proverb that always brings to mind the music from the classic Sesame Street video. Now the “two heads” can be you and your spouse, or you and your financial advisor, but you can also benefit from encouraging a dialogue between the income-you and the spending-you.

Five Ways to Help Avoid Sleepless Nights in Retirement

Financial headlines can be hazardous to your sleep health in retirement. It is easy to get the jitters and start worrying that you should do something, anything but stay on your current financial course. Yet it rarely makes sense to panic and sell your holdings. Over the years I have developed a list of five ways to help you avoid the sleepless nights in retirement that financial headlines can bring.

Worried about Outliving your Money?

If you asked earlier generations what their biggest fear was – they might have answered, “dying too young.” Asking that question today would probably get you the exact opposite answer: “I’m worried about outliving my money.” It’s a fear that is shared by many – even wealthy individuals. According to the 2019 AICPA Going Broke Remains Top Concern in Retirement: Survey of CPA Financial Planners, more than 41% of CPA’s indicated that running out of money was clients’ #1 concern.

You did WHAT!? Common Financial Pitfalls

Avoid common financial pitfalls for a more secure future.

In life and matters of the wallet, rest assured that we all make mistakes. Mistakes are a critical part of our education process – but when it comes to your finances, some lessons and consequences can be quite lasting. In an effort to help you learn from others, and potentially save a great deal of money and heartache, you may wish to review some of the following most common financial mistakes, and ways to avoid or mitigate them.

Roth Accounts: Another Retirement Savings Vehicle

While saving for retirement, many focus on the advantages of traditional Individual Retirement Accounts (IRA) and employer sponsored retirement plans. The advantages of these accounts include a regular savings method that reduces your current, overall taxable income – since your savings contribution comes “right off the top” of your paycheck; and the ability for your employer to make contributions, thereby growing your savings at no additional cost to you.