Money and You

Discover Your Perfect Practical Financial Plan at Any Age

Having a solid handle on your financial well-being makes for one less stressor – and better sleep at night. But then you probably know that. Let’s explore some of the stereotypes and misperceptions that can get in the way of building your financial confidence and reducing stress through planning — and practical ways to get started or move ahead with your plan.

Financial Planning Tips for Your 30s and 40s

Planning for retirement is typically something we think about when we approach our 50s and 60s. However, if you haven't done much (or any) financial planning by your 30s and 40s for your future, it's time for you to get your financial house in order. Remember, when building a house, you must first start with a solid foundation. The same is true for financial planning; get the basic foundation planning done now so as you build your financial future, your structure will be strong.

7 Tips for Financial Planning in your 70s

Many people in their 70s are retired. Whether you're one of them or not, it doesn't mean you should stop your financial planning – in fact it means you should pay even more attention as finances in your 70s offer more opportunities (and risks) now than ever before. Here are seven tips to help make sure you're well prepared for your 70s and beyond.

Six Steps for Financial Planning in Your 60s

Surprise, your 60s have arrived! If you’re someone who hasn’t paid much attention to your financial future before, the 60s are the years to buckle down and get serious. If you have carefully planned your finances throughout your working life, then your 60s is the time to take a second look. Retirement is just around the corner for most people, so whatever your financial habits have been in the past, this is the decade that will determine what the next third of your life will look like.

Financial planning tips for your 50s

Here they come: the golden years. This decade could be the most critical when it comes to retirement planning. You have a career, a good income, and a plan in place for sending your children to college. However, chances are there are still things you need to do to strengthen your finances in order to retire.